[Skip to Content]

Search Results

You searched for: getting-muscles
  • Hamstring Strain for Teens


    A hamstring strain happens when one or more of the muscles in the back of the leg gets stretched too far and starts to tear. Find out how to treat hamstring strains in this article for teens.

  • Quadriceps Contusion for Teens


    Quadriceps contusions are common in sports that have a lot of direct contact or a chance of collisions or wipeouts. Find out what to do if you get one - and how to avoid them.

  • Strength Training for Teens


    Is working out with weights safe for teens? The best way to build muscle tone and definition is to combine aerobic and flexibility exercises with the right kind of strength training.

  • Groin Strain for Teens


    A groin strain is a tear of one or more of the muscles that help you squeeze your legs together. Find out what to do for groin strains - and why it's important not to go back to sports or other activities too quickly.

  • Why Exercise Is Wise for Teens


    Getting the right amount of exercise can rev up your energy levels and even help you to feel better emotionally. Find out why.

  • What Causes Muscle Twitches? for Teens


    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS) for Kids


    Lou Gehrig's disease refers to a disorder called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. This disease damages the neuromuscular system, which allows the body to move.

  • Becker Muscular Dystrophy for Parents


    Becker muscular dystrophy is a genetic disorder that gradually makes the body's muscles weaker and smaller. It causes less severe problems than the most common type of MD, Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  • Tetanus for Teens


    Tetanus is a bacterial infection that grows in a contaminated wound. Because it can be serious, it's important to get immunized. Find out more.

  • Cardiomyopathy for Parents


    Cardiomyopathy is when the heart muscle becomes weak and enlarged, which makes it difficult to pump blood through the body. There’s usually no cure for the condition in children, but it can be treated.